Posts Tagged ‘Redundancy’

Mind Over Money

May 10th, 2010

When I ask my clients what they want more of in their lives, money is often on the list.

Here’s a few ideas to help you have more of it.

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Paralysis by Analysis

March 30th, 2010

Feeling stuck and frustrated?  These two feelings often go together and are often inextricably linked.  Generally you feel frustrated because you are stuck, and there is a simple explanation for being stuck – it is because you’re not moving!  It’s easy to blame other people, our environment, and circumstance but actually, the source is usually us.  The good news is that means we can do something about it.

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Stuck in Procrastination

March 23rd, 2010

Procrastination is defined as “deferring action”. It’s easy to rationalise why we put things off that we don’t want to do – maybe we’re scared of the consequences, maybe we don’t know ‘how’ to go about it, maybe we simply ‘don’t want to’. Sometimes there are even unintended benefits to this procrastination – all sorts of things get done, that wouldn’t otherwise be contemplated – drawers get cleaned out, letters get written, chocolate cakes get baked…. and eventually when the pressure of a looming deadline gets intense enough, and/or the threat of consequences if you don’t do it, get bad enough, the procrastination evaporates and you simply have to take the action required.

But why do we put off doing the things that we DO want to do?

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Take Action!

March 3rd, 2010

As the Nike ads say, “Just do it!”

Knowing what you want and where you are heading is half the battle won, but in order to actually get there, you have to take some action!  You must take the first step and get started, not only to move closer towards your goal, but also to really commit to your intentions and to let the world know that you are serious about this.  The first step can be the hardest but once you’ve done it, it’s easier to keep moving.

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Lynette “Polly” McFadden – Excerpt from the Book – Go Girl Go!

February 11th, 2010

1 Lynette cLynette “Polly” McFadden – Harcourts Real Estate

Lynette, known as Polly to her friends, is a vibrant Maori woman successfully operating several Harcourts real estate offices in the Christchurch area.  A working class background hasn’t stopped her from becoming one of Christchurch’s hottest businesswomen.  Not content with her own success, she shares her positive energy with all around her, inspiring others to succeed and grow into whatever they wish to become.

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Everything is Always Alright in the End

February 10th, 2010

One of my favourite quotes is from the Dalai Lama, “Everything is always alright in the end.  If it is not alright, then it is not the end.”

No matter how bad things seem, it is never forever, it always gets better.  Sometimes you just have to trust the process, and focus on your intended outcome, and remember that the rough patch will pass. 

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Protect Yourself

February 8th, 2010

Most people worry about things that probably will never happen.  But because there is still a chance that they may happen, they worry anyway.  This worry could be eliminated by taking some simple steps to protect yourself and your loved ones from the things that cause you the most concern.

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Up in the Air

January 17th, 2010

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I have to admit to having a bit of a soft spot for George Clooney, so any movie with him in it has a head start in my book.  An interesting, and I guess timely, look at issues of company restructuring and redundancy.  The makers of the film took  interviews of Americans who have been made redundant in the last year, which gave the movie genuine authenticity.  It also takes a look at individuals who bury themselves in their work at the cost of having real relationships.  I’ve made it sound like an intense documentary, but it still falls in the light entertainment category, albeit touching on real issues.

Introduction from Go Girl Go! – The Book

December 9th, 2009

Introduction – From the book Go Girl Go! ñ Real Stories of New Zealand Women in Business
This project started back in 1999 through my own frustrations as a newly self-employed writer.  After completing a journalism course by correspondence Iíd decided I didnít want to go and work for a newspaper or a magazine ñ I wanted to freelance.  This seemed easy enough and I was sure it was the answer to my dreams of freedom.  I started writing and soon I had a few regular contracts and I was surviving, but only just.  The hardest part was not the writing but the business side of it ñ knowing what to charge for my work, getting agreements from people, sorting out taxes and accounting procedures.  I bluffed my way through blindly for months not wanting to ask anybody for help for fear of confirming to them that I really didnít know what I was doing!
One day I came home to my partner frustrated and upset.  I felt I had no idea what I was supposed to be doing and said to him ìItís so hard.  You canít just go into Whitcoulls and buy a book on it.î  ìThatís your answer,î he said.  ìWrite a book for women about getting started in business.î  That upset me even more, how was I supposed to write a book for the rest of the world when I didnít know what I was doing myself?  ìThatís easy,î he said.  ìGo and talk to successful businesswomen and ask them how they got started.î  My initial reaction was ëwhat a cheek!í ñ How rude to ask these successful women to share their secrets!  But the more I thought about it, the more it seemed like a good idea.
When I first sent twenty letters out to successful business women I knew of in my area, I expected about five to be interested in my project.  I hoped for ten.  Eighteen of those women were happy to be interviewed ñ the response was overwhelming!  The first thing I learned through this project is that most people are happy to help you ñ you just have to be brave enough to ask!  I took my search nationwide and was met with the same enthusiasm.  After interviewing about sixty amazing women, all with fantastic stories to tell, I realised I had to stop, it was getting harder and harder to choose which stories to include in this book.
I have endeavoured to select fifteen stories as vastly different from one another as possible, incorporating different types of businesses, age groups, ethnic groups, geographical locations and personal circumstances.  A big thank you to all the women who took the time to share their experiences with me.  I learned from each and every one of you.  Now I hope others will be inspired and motivated and learn from the stories shared in this book.
Enjoy!
Jacqui
Excerpt from Go Girl Go! ñ Real Stories of New Zealand Women
Link to Buy the book

Go Girl Go - The Book by Jacqui ThomasThis project started back in 1999 through my own frustrations as a newly self-employed writer.  After completing a journalism course by correspondence I’d decided I didn’t want to go and work for a newspaper or a magazine - I wanted to freelance.  This seemed easy enough and I was sure it was the answer to my dreams of freedom.  I started writing and soon I had a few regular contracts and I was surviving, but only just.  The hardest part was not the writing but the business side of it - knowing what to charge for my work, getting agreements from people, sorting out taxes and accounting procedures.  I bluffed my way through blindly for months not wanting to ask anybody for help for fear of confirming to them that I really didnít know what I was doing!

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Know Your Worth – What’s Your True Value?

December 8th, 2009

I was reminded the other day of a story I was told a few years ago.  It was about a speaker who pulled a crisp, fresh $100 note out of his pocket and offered it to his audience.  “who would like this $100 note?” he asked.  Of course nearly everyone was keen to accept it with hands waving madly in the air.  “What about this $100 note?” he asked offering a more worn, dirtier looking note, instead.  Still the same people responded, happy to accept the money.  Then he took the worn, dirty note, screwed it up in a ball and stood on it, squashing it into the ground.  When he picked it up, the $100 was barely recognisable but still he offered it to the crowd and still he was met with the same enthusiastic response.  No matter what he did to that piece of paper, it still held it’s same true value, it was still worth $100.

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